Packing An Aquarium When Moving Home

For starters, know that fish are statistically less likely to survive on long trips, so be prepared to possibly lose some of your fish. Therefore, if you are an aquarium fan and are willing to take risks, here are a few suggestions to minimize it.

Packing An Aquarium When Moving Home

For starters, know that fish are statistically less likely to survive on long trips, so be prepared to possibly lose some of your fish. Therefore, if you are an aquarium fan and are willing to take risks, here are a few suggestions to minimize it.

Moving an aquarium involves a lot of work, and as a rule of thumb, the bigger the fish tank, and the more fish in it, the more work to do. So if you can, try donating some fish before leaving.

Careful planning is the key to success in moving the tank.

Transporting fish, even if you have to do all this at the last minute before moving house, you must be prepared with the right container. The method of transporting fish that has been tried and tested is by placing the fish in a seal bag using a rubber band and filling it with oxygen. If you imagine a long trip lasting more than 6 hours, you have to feed fewer fish for a few days before moving, this will minimize their excretion and therefore the water in the bag stays clean for longer.

Ideally these bags should be placed on thermal insulators such as picnic coolers or cooler bags. Try to separate fish from their species and ensure that each bag has enough water for all fish to be soaked comfortably even when the container is slightly tilted generally until the water is above the fish’s back and not excessive.

Moving aquarium equipment, aquarium filtration systems may be the second biggest problem. Useful bacteria begin to die as soon as the oxygen-containing water is released. So remove the media from the filter and place it in its own bag with water from the aquarium. Fill the rest of the bag with air as much as possible. Place this bag in the cooler with the fish if there is space.

Unload the tank and place the aquarium in a bag filled with water. Aquarium plants can last a long time if the roots remain wet. But if you plan a long step more than a day, urinate completely.

Loading and transit, after the fish and equipment are treated, empty the aquarium of all water and protect it with packaging material. Remember not to lift the aquarium from the side wall but always from the base.

On the way, the two most important things for fish safety are temperature and oxygen, so try to keep the temperature in the cooler stable. You can use hot or ice packs according to the situation.

To relocate a great distance you need to fill oxygen in the bag. You can do this just by opening it and allowing fresh air to enter. If you have a battery operated air pump, you can pump in the air for 10 minutes or more in each bag and then seal it again.

Unload, as soon as you arrive at the destination, replace the tank without delay. Fill with new conditioned water and allow the filter and heater to work for a while to ensure that they function properly before actually placing the fish.

The best way to return fish to an aquarium is to place it in a closed bag. Allow 10 to 15 minutes for the water in the bag to reach the same temperature as the new water in the aquarium and then release the bag gently and let the fish swim out.